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Venafi announces new enterprise endpoint management solution

04 Jul 18

Machine identity protection provider Venafi has announced the debut of Venafi Enterprise Mobility Protect, a new solution that safeguards the machine identities used on endpoints that access enterprise networks and resources.

Venafi Enterprise Mobility Protect is now available and delivers continuous visibility and comprehensive machine identity intelligence across all authorised mobile devices, including those that are owned by employees (Bring Your Own Device or BYOD).

With Venafi Enterprise Mobility Protect, organisations can protect the machine identities on mobile endpoints by managing device certificates through a central certificate security platform.

The Venafi Platform delivers certificate visibility, issuance, distribution, and policy enforcement, as well as the control needed to terminate access for unauthorised users and employees.

“As businesses embrace BYOD policies, organisations have multiple teams issuing and using machine identities for mobile devices,” says Venafi security strategy and threat intelligence vice president Kevin Bocek.

The enterprise-class machine identity protection solution for mobile devices increases flexibility by supporting all industry-leading certificate authorities.

Endpoints on enterprise networks – such as Windows, Mac, iOS and Android devices – need access to corporate resources to keep employees connected and productive.

In order to protect the communication between enterprise networks and the increasing number of mobile endpoints, organisations must provide mobile devices of all types with secure machine identities that support authentication, encryption and decryption.

However, if the digital certificates that serve as machine identities for these mobile devices are issued outside of enterprise policy, are not tracked, or are left unrevoked after use, they become prime targets for cybercriminals who can compromise them and then use them to access critical enterprise systems and data.

These issues can be especially problematic with employee-owned devices.

“Venafi makes it possible for security teams to include employee-owned and corporate-owned mobile endpoints in their machine identity protection strategy,” Bocek says.

“This allows all machine identities for mobile devices to be protected and comply with policy throughout their entire lifecycle, regardless of who owns the device or which team issues and manages the machine identity.”

Features of Venafi Enterprise Mobility Protect include:

  • Visibility and protection of machine identities across Windows, OS X, iOS and Android devices.
  • Out-of-the-box integrations with leading devices and systems, including Windows and Mac OS.
  • Single kill switch for mobile devices and applications that allows security teams to terminate access from a single, central console.
  • Support for corporate-owned devices, domain-joined or not, as well as BYOD.
  • Automated certificate issuance from over 40+ certificate authorities including Microsoft, DigiCert, and Entrust.
  • Support for NAC, 802.1X, VPN and other use cases
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