Story image

Managing the information paradox in the NDB/GDPR era

26 Jun 2018

Article by M-Files Australia and New Zealand alliance and partner director Nicholas Delaveris Recent legislation in Australia and overseas puts more stringent requirements around businesses collecting and retaining personal information.

The Australian government’s mandatory notifiable data breaches (NDB) scheme and Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) both demand that organisations protect individuals’ data and notify the appropriate authorities if a breach happens.

While GDPR is primarily a European law, it applies to any business that interacts with a citizen of the European Union, which means many Australian businesses will be affected.  This creates a paradox for businesses who both rely on information and need to protect that information.

Compliance with these new pieces of legislation demands that businesses have unprecedented visibility into the information they collect and store and that they be able to demonstrate how that data has been treated.  Businesses need to make information available at the right time on any device so employees can do their jobs.

But they also need to control that information and make sure no unauthorised person can access it.

These two goals have traditionally been somewhat incompatible.

To overcome this issue, businesses need a solution that helps manage compliance and audits, while making it simple for people with the right permissions to access the data they need.

Compliance is mostly about being able to demonstrate control.

It’s about being able to identify who has accessed information, whether they’ve edited or shared it, and when.

Flat file stores are hard to control and, as people leave and join the business, keeping track of access permissions and history gets tangled. Businesses, therefore, need to take a process-based approach to becoming compliant with NDB and GDPR legislation.

That means taking a step back and gaining an overarching view of data including where it resides and what policies apply to it.

Everyone in the organisation should understand how data needs to be managed and be able to comply with those requirements.

This should be an ongoing process.

Privacy-related legislation tends to include requirements around what personal data can be collected and retained and for what purposes, as well as how businesses must respond to requests for that information either from the individual whose information is stored or from third parties.  Businesses need to be able to react fast and appropriately when they receive requests for data.

They need to know what data can be shared and what data must never be shared.

If a person requests their own data, the business must be able to provide it immediately.

It’s not good enough to say they couldn’t find it or they assume it has been destroyed; they need to be able to prove it. 

Organisations need a solution that tags the data with information such as whether it contains personal details, how long it needs to be kept for, and why it needs to be kept.

If it shouldn’t be kept, the organisation needs to be able to demonstrate that the data has been destroyed.

If the organisation hasn’t destroyed the data, it needs to be able to demonstrate that it’s keeping the data for legal and legitimate reasons.  Managing this process manually is difficult, and businesses can look at automation to simplify these processes.

The cost of trying to maintain compliance without an appropriate, metadata-driven content management tool is prohibitively high.

Salesforce continues to stumble after critical outage
“To all of our Salesforce customers, please be aware that we are experiencing a major issue with our service and apologise for the impact it is having on you."
D-Link hooks up with Alexa and Assistant with new smart camera
The new camera is designed for outdoor use within a wireless smart home network.
Slack users urged to update to prevent security vulnerability
Businesses that use popular messaging platform Slack are being urged to update their Slack for Windows to version 3.4.0 immediately.
Secureworks Magic Quadrant Leader for Security Services
This is the 11th time Secureworks has been positioned as a Leader in the Gartner Magic Quadrant for Managed Security Services, Worldwide.
Google puts Huawei on the Android naughty list
Google has apparently suspended Huawei’s licence to use the full Android platform, according to media reports.
Using data science to improve threat prevention
With a large amount of good quality data and strong algorithms, companies can develop highly effective protective measures.
General staff don’t get tech jargon - expert says time to ditch it
There's a serious gap between IT pros and general staff, and this expert says it's on the people in IT to bridge it.
ZombieLoad: Another batch of flaws affect Intel chips
“This flaw can be weaponised in highly targeted attacks that would normally require system-wide privileges or a complete subversion of the operating system."