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Why IoT and Wi-Fi testing are crucial for security

05 Oct 2017

IoT devices may be more cost-intensive than they could be if organisations don’t invest in ones that can handle the complexity of security and data analytics, even if they provide a range of other conveniences, according to Ixia.

Smart connected devices can offer data accessibility, connectivity, inventory management, analytics and remote work, however if they cannot handle security and analytic demands, the visibility and performance can lead to less-than-ideal efficiency.

According to Ixia’s general manager of Australia and New Zealand Ardy Sharifnia says that organisations are finding out that complexity and a lack of test tools for smart technology and IoT integration are affecting their go-to-market plans.

“Businesses looking to offer an IoT solution need to test their devices’ reliability and security before implementation. Identifying potential performance issues before deployment can ensure robust performance when they are deployed,” Sharifnia says.

Sharifnia believes that comprehensive IoT and WiFi testing can help organisations achieve peace of mind when adding new devices. They will be able to perform as planned, without introducing new risks.

IoT devices come with various levels of security. Ixia states that even if manufacturers have the right resources to build highly security devices, vulnerabilities can be found elsewhere.

This includes vulnerabilities in the operating system and other software. When it happens, businesses must take one of two paths in order to patch the vulnerabilities: Either update or retire the device.

“Security on IoT devices has become more of a concern for the community given the potential for IoT devices to be used by hackers to gain entry to systems and create havoc. So there’s increasing pressure on IoT device manufacturers to not only deliver that initial security and functionality, but also update and patch devices to maintain security,” Sharifnia says.

Ixia states that successful IoT device implementation is about more than having a ‘cool’ device. Testing and ongoing monitoring are two ingredients that are key for their success.

Some testing functions can allow IoT developers to reproduce a range of deployment conditions and WiFi networks so they can rapidly test and verify device performance.

Ixia says this method allows businesses to go to market sooner with more responsive, functional devices.

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