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LogRhythm announces eight cybersecurity predictions for 2019

14 Jan 2019

Article by LogRhythm CISO and Labs vice president James Carder

LogRhythm has announced its top eight cybersecurity predictions for 2019.  

These include: 1.  A cyber attack on an automobile will kill someone.  We’ve already seen hackers remotely kill a Jeep on the highway, disable safety features like air bags and antilock brakes, and hack into a car’s Bluetooth and OnStar features.

As cars become more connected and driverless cars evolve, hackers will have more opportunities of doing real harm. 2.  Cybersecurity programmes will grow, but continue to lag behind the talent gap’s growth by at least 25%. The US Bureau of Labour Statistics anticipates available jobs for information security analysts will grow 28% between 2016 and 2026.

But since 2014, only 3.7% of American universities and colleges have met the requirements necessary to be recognised the National Centers of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense Education Program (CAE-CDE).

LogRhythm doesn’t expect the acceptance rate to suddenly increase, meaning cybersecurity programme growth will lag behind the talent gap by at least 25% in the coming year. 3.  Bio-identifiers will outpace traditional passwords. Authentication using biometrics — especially facial recognition — continues to grow in popularity, and LogRhythm doesn’t see this slowing down any time soon.

Case in point: Apple has made passcodes completely optional starting with 2017’s iPhone X release, and it stuck to its decision with this year’s XS and XS Max releases.

As ease of use remains a top priority for users, traditional passwords will decline in popularity. 4. The United States will experience the “balkanisation” of cybersecurity regulations. 

The United States has been slow to enact cybersecurity legislation at the federal level.

As a result, states have started taking matters into their own hands.

In 2019, LogRhythm expects an increase in cybersecurity legislation at the state level.

And given the lack of consistency between resulting regulations, this will lead to greater challenges when it comes to interstate business operations.   5.  Cloud-based ransomware will compromise a major corporation’s infrastructure.  Ransomware continues to grow in sophistication.

In 2019, LogRhythm believes it will successfully compromise a major corporation’s cloud infrastructure.

The results will be devastating, impacting thousands of customers and resulting in a heavy loss of profits due to missed service level agreements (SLAs) and fines. 6.  China will use cyberespionage to manipulate the market.  China isn’t new to cyberespionage, with reports revealing their efforts cost the United States upwards of US$300 billion annually.

The United States reacted earlier this year by imposing a US$50 billion tariff on Chinese imports.

Given the economic impact of these tariffs, LogRhythm expects China to leverage its cyber-spies to give itself an advantage in the growing trade wars. 7.  Trump’s cell phone will be hacked.  With the President of the United States using an unencrypted phone to communicate with leaders of nations, this has to be a hot target. Just imagine what the potential impact will be — not to mention what will be posted on Twitter. 8.  A move to hold CEOs accountable for breaches.  There are already regulations to hold people accountable (notably CISOs) for breaches.

But as the pace and damage of breaches continue to quicken, LogRhythm believes these regulations begin to expand accountability to the CEO role.  

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