sb-nz logo
Story image

Is BYOD an expensive mistake for your business?

22 Aug 2018

While companies are starting to recognise the need for a mobility solution, there are still many reasons why a bring-your-own-device (BYOD) approach may not be the best approach for the business. Wavelink managing director Ilan Rubin says, “Using BYOD can seem like a simple solution; it lets employees use devices they’re comfortable with and lets businesses avoid investing upfront in devices.

“However, the full implications of letting employees BYOD should be considered, as there may be a better approach depending on the business and the industry.” There are seven reasons why adopting a BYOD policy could be an expensive mistake for businesses: 1. Security

Security is one of the biggest issues with BYOD because of the security risk posed by consumer-grade phones. When staff use these devices to access patient or consumer information, that information can potentially be hacked more easily than with a purpose-built device. 2. Bring your own distraction

There's a risk that encouraging staff to bring in their own devices that are more suited to watching videos, playing games and keeping up-to-date with their digital social lives will mean they will do just that. Consumer devices may reduce productivity, which for most businesses is the strategic goal of implementing a mobility program. 3. Mixing personal and business data

Companies with BYOD risk employees that are leaving the company walking away with a significant amount of client data, available at a touch of the button on their own device if strict policies aren’t in place. On the flipside, employees may also feel their own privacy may be breached by their employer if they are connected to the company network.  4. Ruggedised devices

Unfortunately, there are business environments that consumer-grade technology can’t withstand. If employees are working in areas where they are likely to drop their phone on a concrete floor, or expose the phone to water, dust, strong disinfectants, or if they require a device to monitor temperature in a cold environment like a freezer, they will need special handheld devices designed for these tasks. 5. Vulnerabilities

Employees could be downloading mobile apps and connecting to external Wi-Fi spots without the correct security protocols in place. This creates serious security holes that can be exploited by hackers. Coupled with the fact that employees might not have antivirus protection or have an up-to-date firewall present on their mobile devices, this means they might be more vulnerable to attacks. 6. Device disparities 

With BYOD, employees are likely to have a plethora of devices, all with different capabilities and operating systems that run different programs at different levels of quality. Many companies might not have an IT department resource to ensure all business applications and data workflows work on every different device, which is required for a profitable return on investment.  7. Cost

Having to pay for both the device and the data plans can increase the total cost of ownership for the organisation. Also, trying to implement guidelines and security for the devices can end up costing the organisation more than it originally planned for when it implemented the BYOD system.

Story image
Yubico launches latest YubiKey with NFC & USB-C support
Yubico has released a new hardware authentication key, designed to provide security through both near-field communication (NFC) and USB-C connections and smart card support.More
Story image
The guide to digital security in unstable times
An increase in vulnerability across different sectors has meant that 2020 has seen more than its fair share of cybersecurity incidents. One of the most effective ways to combat the perils of today’s cyber-threats is to gain a better knowledge of the threat vectors looming over the heads of organisations. More
Story image
The most popular usernames of all time revealed
Interestingly, usernames one would think might be quite common, such as admin or user, did not make the list of the 200 most popular usernames.More
Story image
ESET launches the latest version of its Mobile Security solution
“With this latest version of ESET Mobile Security, we want to ensure our users feel completely secure when performing financial transactions on their devices, in addition to being protected from malware and phishing attempts."More
Story image
NZTech chief hopeful for greater diversity in tech sector
With the most diverse board ever, Muller has released a statement that highlights greater inclusion as the tech sector thrives in a pandemic-hit NZ.More
Story image
Video: 10 Minute IT Jams - Who is CrowdStrike?
Today, Techday speaks to CrowdStrike ANZ channel director Luke Francis about the company's key products and offerings, its upcoming annual security conference, and the infrastructure it leverages in the A/NZ region.More