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BT invests to expand cybersecurity presence down under

18 Sep 2017

BT and the New South Wales Government have announced the opening of a new global cybersecurity research and development hub in Sydney.

The new hub represents the expansion of BT’s existing Security Operation Centre (SOC) and its first cybersecurity research and development (R&D) facility outside of the United Kingdom, creating around 170 new highly skilled jobs in the area over five years.

According to BT, the areas of expertise in the new hub will include cybersecurity, machine learning, data science analytics and visualisation, big data engineering, cloud computing, data networking, and the full life cycle of software engineering.

The newly opened operations centre and R&D hub is now part of BT’s global network of 14 Security Operations Centres, providing cybersecurity services for global customers in 180 countries around the world.

The cybersecurity giant asserts solutions developed and supported out of the Sydney hub will be deployed for customers both locally and globally. This is in addition to hosting cybersecurity systems integration and services teams as well as BT’s newly created role of chief global engineer for cyber product development.

CEO of BT Security, Mark Hughes says it’s a momentous time for the company.

“We are thrilled at this exciting new opportunity to tap into local cyber security skills,” says Hughes.

“Never before has cyber security been more important and we see potential for growth in New South Wales, Australia and further afield. The hub will be a cornerstone of our global cyber security capabilities and help us stay ahead in this fast moving space.”

Minister for Innovation, Matt Kean says the NSW government-backed ‘Jobs for NSW’ would provide a AU$1.67 million grant to BT.

“This cutting-edge operation will help keep Australia’s best cybersecurity talent here in NSW while nurturing our next generation of specialists to ensure we remain a regional leader in this fast-growing industry,” says Kean.

"As well as creating 172 jobs, including 38 jobs for skilled graduates over the next five years, BT will also make a $2 million investment in capital infrastructure and a further multi-million dollar investment to employ cyber security specialists at the hub."

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