Story image

117 million LinkedIn members compromised by 2012 data breach

24 May 2016

Over 117 million emails and passwords belonging to LinkedIn members have been put online for sale, it has been revealed.

Worryingly, this trove of information is not thought to have been obtained from a recent data breach.

In fact, it is believed that the data was accessed in 2012, when the professional social network was first breached.

At the time, it was understood that just over six million members had been compromised. However, it appears that the LinkedIn data breach is far bigger than anyone thought.

In a blog post, LinkedIn said that it has “moved swiftly” to deal with this, invalidating, for example, all passwords for accounts that were created before 2012.

Further to this, users all over the world have received an email from the company, which states that it has “taken action to protect your account”.

It adds that the next time members sign in to their accounts, a password reset will be required. However, it is important to note that users must actively log out.

WeLiveSecurity tested this process, and this is what came up when it tried to sign in normally:

As it states, for a password reset, members need to check their email and follow the usual instructions.

WeLiveSecurity recommends that LinkedIn members opt for a strong passphrase, as opposed to a ‘usual’ password.

This quick guide offers an overview of how to do this.

Article by Narinder Purba, senior editor for WeLiveSecurity at ESET

Interview: Culture and cloud - the battle for cybersecurity
ESET CTO Juraj Malcho talks about the importance of culture in a cybersecurity strategy and the challenges and benefits of a world in the cloud.
Enterprise cloud deployments being exploited by cybercriminals
A new report has revealed a concerning number of enterprises still believe security is the responsibility of the cloud service provider.
Ping Identity Platform updated with new CX and IT automation
The new versions improve the user and administrative experience, while also aiming to meet enterprise needs to operate quickly and purposefully.
Venafi and nCipher Security partner on machine identity protection
Cryptographic keys serve as machine identities and are the foundation of enterprise information technology systems.
Machine learning is a tool and the bad guys are using it
KPMG NZ’s CIO and ESET’s CTO spoke at a recent cybersecurity conference about how machine learning and data analytics are not to be feared, but used.
Seagate: Data trends, opportunities, and challenges at the edge
The development of edge technology and the rise of big data have brought many opportunities for data infrastructure companies to the fore.
Popular Android apps track users and violate Google's policies
Google has reportedly taken action against some of the violators.
How blockchain could help stop video piracy in its tracks
An Australian video tech firm has successfully tested a blockchain trial that could end up being a welcome relief for video creators and the fight against video piracy.