Story image

VPNFilter hits more networking devices: ASUS, D-Link, Huawei amongst those affected

08 Jun 2018

Cisco Talos says the VPNFilter malware currently infecting hundreds of thousands of endpoint devices is going after more devices than they initially thought.

The VPNFilter malware surfaced at the end of May and had targeted at least 500,000 routers and storage devices produced by Linksys, Microtik, Netgear, QNAP, and TP-Link.

This week researchers says the malware is targeting even more home-office network and network-attacked storage devices, including ASUS, D-Link, Huawei, Ubiquiti, Upvel, and ZTE.

Researchers say the malware also has new capabilities that allow it to inject malicious content into web traffic as it passed through an infected device.

“ The new module allows the actor to deliver exploits to endpoints via a man-in-the-middle capability (e.g. they can intercept network traffic and inject malicious code into it without the user's knowledge). With this new finding, we can confirm that the threat goes beyond what the actor could do on the network device itself, and extends the threat into the networks that a compromised network device supports,” they state.

“Additionally, we've discovered an additional stage 3 module that provides any stage 2 module that lacks the kill command the capability to disable the device. When executed, this module specifically removes traces of the VPNFilter malware from the device and then renders the device unusable.”

Cisco Talos says it will continue to monitor the VPNFilter threat and work with partners to understand it. 

Read our previous coverage about the VPNFilter threat here.

The full list of affected devices is below. Cisco warns that this list may still be incomplete.

ASUS DEVICES:

  • RT-AC66U (new)
  • RT-N10 (new)
  • RT-N10E (new)
  • RT-N10U (new)
  • RT-N56U (new)
  • RT-N66U (new)

D-LINK DEVICES:

  • DES-1210-08P (new)
  • DIR-300 (new)
  • DIR-300A (new)
  • DSR-250N (new)
  • DSR-500N (new)
  • DSR-1000 (new)
  • DSR-1000N (new)

HUAWEI DEVICES:

  • HG8245 (new)

LINKSYS DEVICES:

  • E1200
  • E2500
  • E3000 (new)
  • E3200 (new)
  • E4200 (new)
  • RV082 (new)
  • WRVS4400N

MIKROTIK DEVICES:

  • CCR1009 (new)
  • CCR1016
  • CCR1036
  • CCR1072
  • CRS109 (new)
  • CRS112 (new)
  • CRS125 (new)
  • RB411 (new)
  • RB450 (new)
  • RB750 (new)
  • RB911 (new)
  • RB921 (new)
  • RB941 (new)
  • RB951 (new)
  • RB952 (new)
  • RB960 (new)
  • RB962 (new)
  • RB1100 (new)
  • RB1200 (new)
  • RB2011 (new)
  • RB3011 (new)
  • RB Groove (new)
  • RB Omnitik (new)
  • STX5 (new)

NETGEAR DEVICES:

  • DG834 (new)
  • DGN1000 (new)
  • DGN2200
  • DGN3500 (new)
  • FVS318N (new)
  • MBRN3000 (new)
  • R6400
  • R7000
  • R8000
  • WNR1000
  • WNR2000
  • WNR2200 (new)
  • WNR4000 (new)
  • WNDR3700 (new)
  • WNDR4000 (new)
  • WNDR4300 (new)
  • WNDR4300-TN (new)
  • UTM50 (new)

QNAP DEVICES:

  • TS251
  • TS439 Pro
  • Other QNAP NAS devices running QTS software

TP-LINK DEVICES:

  • R600VPN
  • TL-WR741ND (new)
  • TL-WR841N (new)

UBIQUITI DEVICES:

  • NSM2 (new)
  • PBE M5 (new)

UPVEL DEVICES:

  • Unknown Models* (new)

ZTE DEVICES:

  • ZXHN H108N (new)
Salesforce continues to stumble after critical outage
“To all of our Salesforce customers, please be aware that we are experiencing a major issue with our service and apologise for the impact it is having on you."
D-Link hooks up with Alexa and Assistant with new smart camera
The new camera is designed for outdoor use within a wireless smart home network.
Slack users urged to update to prevent security vulnerability
Businesses that use popular messaging platform Slack are being urged to update their Slack for Windows to version 3.4.0 immediately.
Secureworks Magic Quadrant Leader for Security Services
This is the 11th time Secureworks has been positioned as a Leader in the Gartner Magic Quadrant for Managed Security Services, Worldwide.
Google puts Huawei on the Android naughty list
Google has apparently suspended Huawei’s licence to use the full Android platform, according to media reports.
Using data science to improve threat prevention
With a large amount of good quality data and strong algorithms, companies can develop highly effective protective measures.
General staff don’t get tech jargon - expert says time to ditch it
There's a serious gap between IT pros and general staff, and this expert says it's on the people in IT to bridge it.
ZombieLoad: Another batch of flaws affect Intel chips
“This flaw can be weaponised in highly targeted attacks that would normally require system-wide privileges or a complete subversion of the operating system."