Story image

The Implications of a data disaster and why effective DR is critical

13 Dec 2018
Sponsored

It is the prerogative of every organisation to make sure that they are reducing every avenue of potential financial losses.

In today’s climate, this means reducing liability obligations by ensuring greater security for customers and employees to prevent the multitude of ways that insufficient preparation for an unexpected event can cost an organisation money.

For the sheer majority of companies, a data disaster can be absolutely crippling and even put them out of business - and there is no shortage of causes. Hardware failures are common, as well as loss of power, software failure, data corruption, external security breaches, and the inevitable accidental user error.

But what actually happens in a data disaster? Well for starters, there are the much publicised legal repercussions that come if a company has not made sufficient effort to protect its clients’ data.

Not only can this cost in terms of fines, legal fees, and compensation, but also in the loss of custom or clientele that comes with the kind of bad press that losing customer data can bring.

Then, there are the more direct consequences of not having a solid disaster recovery plan, such as the cost of operational downtime, losing hundreds, if not thousands of dollars for every minute that a company’s systems are inoperational.

And with the expectations of the modern IT industry, on-premise backup just is not enough - if something happens to that single server’s location, that’s all that data gone for at least a few days, if not permanently.

With the ability for companies of any shape or size to decentralise their backups, there is no longer any excuse.

Of course, simply throwing everything into a folder in the cloud will only lead to headaches in the long run - having a recovery solution that is not well-orchestrated is akin to having no real recovery solution at all.

With all of the time and money that an organisation puts into creating assets and sourcing data, why would anyone put that at risk with a sub-par recovery solution?

In fact, even the insurance that you take out on those assets is worthless if it can’t actually replace the data itself - and making sure it is easily recoverable can actually reduce premiums, to begin with.

By definition, a disaster is not something you can predict, but you can be prepared and minimise any impact from that moment when the unexpected becomes a sudden and terrible reality.

When disaster strikes, people will go into crisis mode. With a well thought-through disaster recovery plan, knowing that the company’s information and data can be accessed in a moment can help management ensure that panic does not take over.

Interactive Director of Data Centre & Business Continuity Clint Seagrave says they understand the industry-specific challenges facing today's financial services sector, and have the capabilities and knowledge to comply to those requirements.

“We recognise the importance of providing our customers with reliability and continuity of service. We are proud to have successfully supported many customers with their disaster recovery requirements, and their continued operations in an event of breakdown," says Seagrave.

“At Interactive, we know the importance of having a dedicated disaster recovery in place and regularly tested to ensure it works. Our customers rely on our experience and expertise, developed over the past 30 years, to assist them when their business is most vulnerable.”

Click here to find out more.

Kiwis know security is important, but they're not doing much about it
Only 49% of respondents use antivirus software and even fewer – just 19% -  change their passwords regularly.
Avi Networks: Using visibility to build trust
Visibility, also referred to as observability, is a core tenet of modern application architectures for basic operation, not just for security.
Privacy: The real cost of “free” mobile apps
Sales of location targeted advertising, based on location data provided by apps, is set to reach $30 billion by 2020.
Myth-busting assumptions about identity governance - SailPoint
The identity governance space has evolved and matured over the past 10 years, changing with the world around it.
Forrester names Crowdstrike leader in incident response
The report provides an in-depth evaluation of the top 15 IR service providers across 11 criteria.
Slack doubles down on enterprise key management
EKM adds an extra layer of protection so customers can share conversations, files, and data while still meeting their own risk mitigation requirements.
Security professionals want to return fire – Venafi
Seventy-two percent of professionals surveyed believe nation-states have the right to ‘hack back’ cybercriminals.
Alcatraz AI to replace corporate badges with AI security
The Palo Alto-based startup supposedly leverages facial recognition, 3D sensing, and machine learning to enable secure access control.