Story image

It's time to pick up the pace on HTTPS encryption, survey finds

30 May 2017

Less than half of internet sites support HTTPS, despite it being a 'must have' for all businesses, according to a new report from web optimisation provider SEMrush.

The company conducted data on 100,000 anonymous websites and 45% of them supported HTTPS. While the sample was small, many of them supposedly used the secure protocol.

9% of those websites still had insecure pages with password input fields - even though Google requires that any website that collects passwords should be encrypted.

The company says that even minor errors in HTTPS implementation can cost them in user security factors and Google attention.

Last year Google announced that as of January this year, Chrome started marking HTTP pages that collected passwords or credit cards as non-secure, as part of an effort to mark all HTTP sites as non-secure.

That implementation can come down to using mixed content, which means that browsers will warn users about loading insecure content, which can impact the user experience and user confidence. 50% of all analysed websites fell into that trap.

The company also found that 50% of websites that were moving to HTTPS still included errors through internal links to HTTP pages.

8% of analysed websites had an HTTP homepage that didn't match its HTTPS version. While this isn't much of a problem for those websites that support HSTS, those that don't could find that they encounter page competition, traffic loss and poor placement.

At the certificate level, 2% had expired SSL (Secure Socket Layer) certificate, and 6% of websites had a certificate registered to the wrong name. SSL certificates are used to make sure a connection between browser and server is secure, and also stops information from being stolen.

It's out with the old, as 3.6% of websites had an old security protocol, and SNI-related errors accounted for 0.56% of websites.

And it's in with the new: The study found that 86% of analysed websites didn't support HSTS (HTTP Strict Transport Security), although the technology is relatively new.

Interview: Culture and cloud - the battle for cybersecurity
ESET CTO Juraj Malcho talks about the importance of culture in a cybersecurity strategy and the challenges and benefits of a world in the cloud.
Enterprise cloud deployments being exploited by cybercriminals
A new report has revealed a concerning number of enterprises still believe security is the responsibility of the cloud service provider.
Ping Identity Platform updated with new CX and IT automation
The new versions improve the user and administrative experience, while also aiming to meet enterprise needs to operate quickly and purposefully.
Venafi and nCipher Security partner on machine identity protection
Cryptographic keys serve as machine identities and are the foundation of enterprise information technology systems.
Machine learning is a tool and the bad guys are using it
KPMG NZ’s CIO and ESET’s CTO spoke at a recent cybersecurity conference about how machine learning and data analytics are not to be feared, but used.
Seagate: Data trends, opportunities, and challenges at the edge
The development of edge technology and the rise of big data have brought many opportunities for data infrastructure companies to the fore.
Popular Android apps track users and violate Google's policies
Google has reportedly taken action against some of the violators.
How blockchain could help stop video piracy in its tracks
An Australian video tech firm has successfully tested a blockchain trial that could end up being a welcome relief for video creators and the fight against video piracy.