sb-nz logo
Story image

How to successfully phase out legacy physical security systems

Legacy physical security systems often create a cumbersome and difficult environment for those that need to make use of them. Examples of this can often be seen in enterprises, especially in educational institutions. 

However, many institutions despite being aware of the issue, have struggled to move away from these legacy systems.

The vast majority of educational institutions have embraced the concept of multi-function Smart Cards or “one cards” and realise the benefits of such a migration, HID found that out by speaking with these institutions directly, however, some are still lagging behind the majority in transitioning.

These institutions understand that moving from legacy technologies to contactless, high-frequency Smart Cards will provide their students, faculty and staff with a more secure and convenient on-campus experience, however, they are still being held up. 

Surprisingly, it wasn’t merely budget constraints or limited resources. Interviews conducted with several institutions by HID revealed that many just didn’t know where to start.

Given that revelation, HID thought they should share some insights regarding recommended best practices that can really help colleges and universities begin to implement these modern solutions

Based on their own implementation experience and interviews with institutions that have successfully traversed the gap from legacy magstripe and prox cards to multi-function Smart Cards, the six critical steps detailed in the White Paper are:

Step 1: Ensure all stakeholders are included in the process

Step 2: Complete a baseline evaluation and security assessment

Step 3: Clearly define the goals of your campus card solution and select relevant elements

Step 4: Leverage outside support to tie services together

Step 5: Select a service provider/integration partner

Step 6: Issue multi-technology credentials and upgrade only critical access readers

While it can seem difficult at first glance to know just where to begin a large transition such as a campus-wide Smart Card upgrade, having a plan in place and leveraging tried and true best practices take the guess-work out of such an endeavour and lay the foundation for a smoother, less costly and successful migration. 

As such, HID prepared a  White Paper which details recommended action items as well as topics to take into consideration during both the initial planning and first phases of your implementation.

You can find out more by clicking here.

Story image
Attivo Networks expands Active Directory suite for greater protection
"We see Active Directory exploitation used in the majority of ransomware, insider and advanced attacks. We are pleased to now offer our customers early and efficient solutions for preventing the misuse of Active Directory.”More
Story image
New wormable Android malware discovered through auto-replies in WhatsApp
Check Point Research has discovered new malware on Google’s Play Store that could spread through WhatsApp messages. More
Story image
2020 sees a global shift in financial malware threats
The financial threat landscape experienced a game-changing pandemic year, according to a new report from Kaspersky.More
Link image
Virtual demo: Diagnose network cabling problems with the LinkIQ Cable+Network Tester
If you’re finding it difficult to install access points and cabling, or if you can’t pinpoint an issue with a video camera or end user, the LinkIQ Cable+Network Tester could be exactly what you need. Try a free, fully interactive demo now.More
Story image
Infrastructure-as-code, and how it can secure the cloud
Bridgecrew recognised IaC early on as one of the best ways for modern teams to delegate security ownership to individual contributors while distributing it across existing frameworks within CI/CD pipelines. This attribute meant that IaC was invaluable in securing cloud-native environments.More
Story image
Mobile devices biggest enterprise security threat - report
Businesses have left themselves vulnerable and open to cyber criminals in the rush to ensure their workforce could operate remotely during the Covid-19 pandemic.More