Story image

How to ensure stronger security in the multi-front WiFi security battle

14 Sep 17

WiFi is a major part of the government and private sector’s ability to provide internet access to networks and critical applications anytime and anywhere, however WiFi security still has a lot to answer for, according to advice from NETSCOUT.

The number of threats against networks have risen steadily and the company believe this rise is due in part because it’s easy to launch attacks against wireless networks.

"From plugging in cheap unauthorised/rogue access points (APs) in the network, to downloading attack tools from the internet, to buying radio frequency jammers that make the entire wireless spectrum unusable, network and security operation teams are fighting a multi-front WiFi security battle,” comments Netscout’s director of APAC channels, Amit Rao.

The company says the latest wireless attacks and hack attempts can range from snooping and denial of service attacks to cracking and information theft.

“There are often misconceptions around the false security offered by the AP infrastructure to monitor itself. In fact, the AP itself can be a target for hackers.”

Netscout says that in some organisations, it could be necessary to create no-wireless zones in particularly sensitive areas.

These zones can cover certain areas, a whole building or the entire perimeter. Perimeter protection can prevent WiFi drone attacks and stop wireless campers from accessing the network.

“The number one thing is to define the boundaries. Secondly, define the policy for detection. Include things like rogue AP detection, rogue station detection, WiFi pineapples, and honeypot detection, and always refine the company policies. Lastly, define the response when a rogue device has been detected including locating the unauthorised device, deciding who is going to retrieve it, and keeping evidence for potential prosecution,” Rao explains.

"Organisations need to be on the leading edge of detecting the latest wireless threats to meet the security, performance, and compliance demands of today’s mobile workforce. To do this organisations should look for a solution with 24x7 always-on WLAN assurance, an analysis engine for alarm signatures, and dynamic threat updates, comprehensive WLAN reporting, and spectrum analysis,” Rao concludes.

NZ Internet Task Force joins iSANZ Hall of Fame
NZITF chair Barry Brailey and former chairs Mike Seddon and Paul McKitrick received the award in Auckland last week.
Quantum computing: The double-edged sword for cybersecurity
Quantum computing is quickly moving from science fiction to reality.
Three ways to achieve data security whilst enabling BYOD
"A mobility strategy is now more important than ever before, that said, selecting the right one is often no small task."
How IoT and hybrid cloud will change in 2019
"Traditional VPN software solutions are obsolete for the new IT reality of hybrid and multi-cloud."
WatchGuard’s eight (terrifying) 2019 security predictions
The next evolution of ransomware, escalating nation-state attacks, biometric hacking, Wi-Fi protocol security, and Die Hard fiction becomes reality.
GCSB's CORTEX project scoops iSANZ Award
“I believe this award is particularly significant as it is acknowledgement from our peers in the information security industry and from across the private sector."
NZ firms lack cybersecurity confidence, HP survey says
Out of 434 of New Zealand’s small and large businesses, only half (50%) feel confident that they would be able to cope if they experienced a significant cybersecurity breach.
SonicWall secures hybrid clouds by simplifying firewall deployment
Once new products are brought online in remote locations, administrators can manage local and distributed networks.